2nd July 1689

2nd July 1689

Captain Ash’s Diary:

 

“2nd [July 1689] In the evening, the enemy drove about two hundred Protestants, men women and children, to our walls as they threatened in their proposals.”

 
Letter from Marshall General Conrad de Rosen to the defenders of Derry-[30th June 1689]

 

“…that in case they do not betwixt this and Monday next, at six of the clock in the afternoon, being the first day of July… agree to surrender the said place of Londonderry unto the King, ….. that he will forthwith issue out his orders from the Barony of Innishowen, and the sea-coast round about as far as Charlemont, for the gathering together of those of their faction, whether protected or not, and cause them immediately to be brought to the walls of Londonderry, where it shall be lawful for those in the same (in case they have any pity on them) to open the gates and receive them into the city, otherwise they will be forced to see their friends and nearest relations all starved for want of food…He further declares, that in case they refuse to submit, he will forthwith cause all the said country to be immediately destroyed, that if any succour should be hereafter sent them from England, they may perish with them for want of sustenance… and burning the houses and mills, not only of those that are in actual rebellion, but also of their friends and adherents, that no hopes of escaping may be left for any man… Moreover he declares, that in case before the said Monday, the first day of July, in the year of our Lord 1689, be expired, they do not send us hostages, and other deputies with a full and sufficient power to treat with us for the surrender of the said city of Londonderry… they shall not, after that time, be admitted into any treaty whatsoever; and the army which shall continue the siege, and will, with the assistance of God, soon reduce it, shall have order to give no quarter, or spare either age or sex, in case it is taken by force. LE MARSHAL DE ROSEN”.

Captain Ash’s Diary:

 

“2nd [ July 1689]… upon which we caused Lord Nettervill, Sir Garret Aylmore, the Capts. Butler, M’Donald, and Newcomen, [ Jacobite officers taken prisoner by the defenders. Normally, when officers were taken prisoner, they were held in lodgings or houses under guard, rather like being under house arrest. The ordinary soldiers were thrown in jail] to be sent to Newgate. They were desired to prepare for death against eight o’clock the next day; but gave them liberty to write to their friends in the camp, to beg that the Protestants under the wall might be permitted to return to their respective dwellings, and to live peaceably amongst them, as they had done since the Siege began: that then the before-mentioned prisoners, would obtain the liberty they formerly enjoyed; but if that would not be granted, the prisoners expected nothing but death”
Letter from Lord Nettervill and his colleagues to Lieutenant General Richard Hamilton: “MY LORD…you have so incensed the Governor and others of this garrison, that we are all condemned by a court-martial to die to-morrow, unless those poor people be withdrawn. We have made application to Marshal-General de Rosen; but having received no answer, we make it our request to you (as knowing you are a person that does not delight in shedding innocent blood) that you will represent our condition to the Marshal-General. The lives of 20 prisoners lie at stake, and therefore require your diligence and care. We are all willing to die (with our swords in our hands) for His Majesty; but to suffer like malefactors is hard, nor can we lay our blood to the charge of the garrison, the Governor and the rest having used and treated us with all civility imaginable.—We remain,
“Your most dutiful and dying friends,
NETERVILL, (Writ by another hand, he himself has lost the fingers of his right hand)

 


Hamilton’s reply:

 

“GENTLEMEN, In answer to yours; what those poor people are like to suffer, they may thank themselves for, being their own fault, which they may prevent by accepting the conditions which have been offered them; and if you suffer in this it cannot be helped, but shall be revenged on many thousands of those people within or without that city. Yours, R. HAMILTON.”

 


Captain Ash’s Diary 2nd [July 1689]:

 

“While the enemy were driving the Protestants down the hill, a cannon was discharged from the walls which killed two of the enemy’d foot-men and one of the horsemen, but touched none of the others, although they were all intermixed; an instance of the wonderful providence of God in favour of the poor Protestants.”